This Little Piggy
       
     
Pushkin's Greed
       
     
The Gardener's Gold
       
     
This Little Piggy
       
     
This Little Piggy

Inspired by story of ‘Gullunbursti’, who’s creation is related in the Skáldskaparmál section of ‘Prose Edda’, a piece of Norse literature written by the 13th Century Icelandic poet Snorri Sturluson.

When Loki had Sif's hair, Freyr's ship Skíðblaðnir, and Odin's spear Gungnir fashioned by the Sons of Ivaldi, he bet his own head with Brokkr that his brother Eitri (Sindri) would not have been able to make items to match the quality of those mentioned above.

So to make gifts to the Norse God Freyr, Eitri threw a pig's skin into a furnace as Brokkr worked on the bellows, and together they manufactured the boar Gullinbursti which had bristles in its mane that glowed in the dark.

Freyr is said to “bestow peace and pleasure on Mortals” and so here is my gift to you Freyr, oblige me.

Pushkin's Greed
       
     
Pushkin's Greed

Inspired by 'The Tale of the Fisherman & the Fish' a short story by the great Russian poet, Alexander Pushkin. An old fisherman and woman have been living poorly for many years. They have a small hut, and every day the man goes out to fish. One day, he throws in his net and pulls out seaweed two times in succession, but on the third time he pulls out a golden fish. The fish pleads for its life, promising any wish in return. However, the old man is scared by the fact that a fish can speak; he says he does not want anything, and lets the fish go.

When he returns and tells his wife about the golden fish, she gets angry and tells her husband to go ask the fish for a new trough, as theirs is broken, and the fish happily grants this small request. The next day, the wife asks for a new house, and the fish grants this also. Then, in succession, the wife asks for a palace, to become a noble lady, to become the ruler of her province, and finally to become the Ruler of the Sea and to subjugate the golden fish completely to her boundless will. As the man goes to ask for each item, the sea becomes more and more stormy, until the last request, where the man can hardly hear himself think. When he asks that his wife be made the Ruler of the Sea, the fish cures her greed by putting everything back to the way it was before, including the broken trough.

This piece captures Pushkin's idea of greed and my belief that, in poetry, the truth is never so picturesque.

The Gardener's Gold
       
     
The Gardener's Gold

Inspired by the short story "The Golden Bird", a Brothers Grimm fairy tale, number 57, about the pursuit of a golden bird by a gardener's three sons. This image represents the gardener, who's loyally for his king exceeds the love of his children.